Sunday, 10 December 2017

Military Wives 'Missing Out' On Up To £30,000 Of Pension

Wives or partners of those who have served abroad in the armed forces may be missing out on pension payments worth thousands of pounds.
Last year the government launched a scheme to offer National Insurance Credits to 20,000 military spouses.
But following a Freedom of Information Request, insurance firm Royal London discovered that fewer than 4,000 people have applied for it so far.
The payments could be worth up to £30,000 over the course of retirement.

Turn2us - Financial Support To Armed Forces & Veterans


If you are a serving member of the armed forces or a veteran, there may be benefits, grants or other financial support available to you and your family.

There are a number of military charities that provide support, each with their own set of eligibility requirements. Help may be available to you from one of these charities if you:

•Are still serving

•Are a veteran

•Serve or served as a regular or reserve, because of the Second World War or National Service

•Had a long or short period of service

•Are the partner, spouse, widow, widower or dependent child of someone who served


 

Little Troopers, Brand New Tri-Service Separation Packs, available for families to buy


BRAND NEW Tri-service Separation Packs

Tri-service Separation Packs are now available! Perfect for any British Army, Royal Navy or Royal Air Force family (regular or reserve)
Suitable for short or long separations;
World map & Stickers
10 x Chuff Charts Sheets & complete stickers
6 x Illustrated Postcards
Photo Frame
Little Trooper passport
Separation Booklet

View more and order here.....

Are You Leaving Your SFA Empty Over The Holiday?

0800 707 6000

Future Accommodation Model - Update

Please click on image to enlarge, and for more
information please click HERE

Wellbeing Day Friday 19th January 2018 - Hart Shopping Centre, Fleet

Click on image to enlarge

Hampshire Alerts - Festive season safety


Christmas is a time to relax and have fun but it can also be very busy and stressful. You may be out and about more than usual – for that essential Christmas shopping and to festive parties and other social events – and the last thing you need is to become a victim of crime. To help avoid this, consider some of the following advice:

Christmas Parties

· Most of us like a drink or two but remember that alcohol will affect your judgment – don’t let it endanger your personal safety.

· Remember, the most common date rape drug is alcohol, with victims being given drinks with a far higher alcohol content than they think.

· Watch your drinks and food to ensure that nothing is added to them.

· Never leave your drink unattended, even if you are going to dance or to the toilet.

· If your drink has been left unattended, don't drink any more of it.

· If something tastes or looks odd, don't eat/drink any more of it. Be aware, though, that some date rape drugs are colourless and tasteless.

· If someone you don't know or trust offers to buy you a drink either decline or accompany them to the bar and watch that nothing is added.

· Know your own limit.

· If you meet someone new at a party, avoid going home with them or inviting them back to your home/accepting a lift from them. It's far safer to arrange a second date in a public place to get to know the person better. If you do find yourself alone with someone you don't know well, make sure that someone knows where you are and who you're with.

· Pay attention to your instincts. If you feel uneasy about someone, there may be a reason.

· Carry your keys, mobile phone and some money in your pocket on the way home, so you can give up your handbag or wallet and escape quickly if necessary.

Christmas Shopping

· Don’t get loaded down with too many bags. Try to keep one hand free.

· Try and avoid taking young children into busy shopping areas. If it is unavoidable make sure they know what to do if they lose you, e.g. tell the nearest counter assistant that they are lost and NEVER leave a shop without you.

· Agree a meeting point with older children in case you get separated.

· Be careful where you park your car, especially if you will be returning to it after dark.

· If parking in a multi-storey car park, choose a well-lit space as close to the exit as possible and away from pillars. Reverse into position.

· Keep car doors locked whilst driving in built-up areas, especially if you’ve got bags of presents in the car.

· Don’t leave presents on show in a parked car, as they could tempt thieves.

· Keep alert and aware of your surroundings, especially in busy shops and crowded streets where thieves and pickpockets may well be operating.

· Keep a close watch on your valuables and try not to keep them all in one place.

Transport

· The party’s over and you need to get home. You are likely to be tired and slightly the worse for wear so you need to be careful.

· The ideal plan is to book your cab or taxi in advance or call a licensed cab company from the party and arrange for them to pick you up right outside the venue.

· Never accept a lift from a minicab touting for trade on the street. They are illegal and can be very dangerous.

· Always sit in the back of a cab/taxi and if you get chatting to the driver, do not give away personal details. If you feel uneasy with the driver, ask him to stop at a busy familiar place and get out.

· If using public transport, have your ticket, pass or change ready in your hand so that your wallet or purse is out of sight.

· Always wait for the bus or train in a well-lit place near other people if possible and try and arrange for someone to meet you at the bus stop or station.

· Take note of where the emergency alarms are and try to sit near them.

· If a bus is empty or it is after dark, you may feel safer on the lower deck as near as possible to the driver.

· On trains, avoid empty compartments or compartments that have no access to corridors or other parts of the train. If you feel threatened on any public transport press the alarm and/or make as much noise as possible to attract attention of your fellow passengers or the driver or guard.

Combat Stress releases top tips to help former servicemen and women cope with pressure of Christmas

Combat Stress, the UK’s leading charity for veterans’ mental health, is sharing its tops tips to help former servicemen and women cope with the Christmas and New Year period.
Christmas is a time for celebration, yet it can be difficult for veterans with mental health problems. Some may feel isolated, lonely or depressed, while others can feel overwhelmed by large gatherings of family and friends, or feel they don’t have time for themselves.
Combat Stress has put together 10 steps veterans can take to enjoy Christmas and the New Year. In fact, it’s advice most people can use if they feel overwhelmed or anxious during the festivities. The tips are:
  • Take time out for yourself
  • Go outdoors for a walk or activity
  • Do something you enjoy
  • Relax with a bath, hot chocolate or play music
  • Remember to take your medication
  • Help out by volunteering for local projects or charities
  • Watch a film
  • Avoid alcohol and caffeine
  • Eat the right ‘good’ food
  • Get support – call the Combat Stress Helpline
The tips include advice to practice meditation, which is especially good to do if you become stressed when surrounded by lots of people on a busy high street or when celebrating Christmas with loved ones. Take yourself off to a quiet place – a coffee shop or another room – and then return when you feel less anxious.
Going outside for a walk or outdoor activities is a good way to distract yourself from things that are causing you stress or anxiety. Avoiding alcohol and caffeine three hours before bedtime will improve your chances of having a good night’s sleep, while getting your five a day of fruit and vegetables will not only help feed a healthier body but also a healthier mind.
Sue Freeth, Chief Executive of Combat Stress, said: “We know many veterans with mental health conditions can find the Christmas period particularly challenging. We hope our tips, put together by our specialist clinical team, will help.
“It’s important veterans talk to a friend or family member about how they’re feeling so they can receive support. The Combat Stress 24-hour Helpline is available throughout Christmas and the New Year. We strongly encourage veterans and their loved ones to call us for help and support on 0800 138 1619, text us on 07537 404 719 or email helpline@combatstress.org.uk.”
Combat Stress’ Christmas tips will be shared on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram from 14 December through to Christmas Eve.

Forces Health BUPA Scheme

See HERE for further information

Service Leavers Guide

This booklet has been produced to provide help and advice on a range of topics as you plan for your transition to civilian life. It aims to give useful information on the sort of help you can  get, who can provide it and the action you need to take.